Car Colour Wheel

One of the ways people express themselves is through their possessions, and so we have chosen the second most expensive purchase that people make: which is their car.
 

Apart from the type and even the make of the car check out the history and evolution of car colours.
 

1920
The horse carriage lookalike vehicle was dropped and cars developed more diversity in style, which was accompanied by more colour choices.
 

The colours blue, green and red were introduced, giving a brighter set of choices.
 

1920
 

1930
The concept of colour being used for personal taste was born following the economic boom of the Roaring ‘Twenties, following WW1, which increased the demand for automobiles. But the Model T remained black.
 

1930
 

1940
Automobile production came to a halt as WW2 broke out and people were forced to produce military cars that came in dark shades that lacked chrome and embellishment.
 

1940
 

1950
The regeneration of interest in automobile production sparked again with the introduction of style being reflected in aspects of adventure, success, post-WW2 euphoria and fashion. Colours were then produced to cater to the detailed features present in cars. Among them were blue, green, gold, white, and black, as well as two-tone and the effects of ivory and jewels.
 

1950
 

1960
This decade saw the popularisation of increasing health standards and being environmentally conscious, hence earth tones began ruling the market for car colours.
 

1960
 

1970
As performance grew to be a gruelling achievement, red, green and blue cars were highlighted as less conventional in order to stand out, as well as yellow and violet, which made their way onto the list.
 

1970
 

1980
Traditional colours such as black and red were increasing in popularity.
 

1980
 

1990
This period gave birth to the very popular SUVs and family-oriented cars, which were portrayed in monotone colours. It also saw the continuation of the environment-conscious earth tones that were established in the 1960s.
 

1990